CCAE Conference Dinner Cruise–It’s Going to be a Grand Affair

From Ball Caps to Ball Gowns...

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We look forward to having you at our Hornblower Dinner Cruise Event during our upcoming conference, on Friday evening!

We encourage you to dress for a grand affair! The attire for the evening will be formal or business formal.

Registered already, but want to add a cruise ticket for yourself or a guest? No problem! 

Contact administrator@ccaestate.org.

CCAE History–Celebrating 75 Years

The Mission of CCAE

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As we celebrate the 75th Anniversary of the California Council for Adult Education (CCAE), let's take one last look back at a bit of our history. If you'll remember, last month we took a look at the structure of CCAE. This month, the Mission:

CCAE has always focused on promoting professional standards for adult educators and influencing legislation that protects and promotes Adult Education in California.

One of CCAE's major task is to keep a vigilant watch on legislation that affects the Adult Education community in California. By communicating with, and keeping our Assemblyman and Senators informed of Adult Education needs, we can foster better legislation for Adult Education.

The California Council for Adult Education is people working together for the advancement and continued professionalization of Adult Education in California. CCAE is unique among education organizations in its breadth of membership. Our members are the practitioners of Adult Education: Teachers, administrators, counselors, classified support staff, students and community.

Mission Statement

The mission of the California Council for Adult Education is to take a leadership role in promoting adult education, providing professional development, and effecting change to best serve the needs and interests of adult education, the CCAE membership and the people of California.

With a starting membership of 244 in 1944, to the nearly 3,000 members today, we continue to be guided by these words:

"To all of you who fought a noble battle and won a creditable victory goes the thanks and gratitude of all people who believe in adult education. Adult education would have been seriously hurt this year if it had not been for the united efforts of the California Council for Adult Education, the California Teachers Association, the California Association of Adult Administrators, and thousands of interested adults and citizens."

Our struggles are not over. Undoubtedly additional attempts will be made to curtail the finances and the programs of adult education. Your membership and the memberships of all your associates are needed now to continue the fine work of the legislation committee and your officers. Let us not wait until the crisis is upon us. We must act now."

Dr. George C. Mann
October, 1953
From the Council News (forerunner of the Communicator) 

This information was condensed from the CCAE State Leadership Handbook, 2018-2019. Most of the information was researched by Steve Prantalos (Executive Director, 1999-2013) and Virginia Donnellan, (President, 1995-1996).

I hope you will join me in celebrating the 75th anniversary of the California Council for Adult Education (CCAE). May we continue to work together in support of the adult students in the state of California for many years to come.

Best Wishes for a great month ahead---I hope to see you at LEG Day in Sacramento and the CCAE State Conference in San Diego!

Adriana Sanchez-Aldana
Executive Director
California Council for Adult Education (CCAE)

Teacher Spotlight

Geno Malkiewicz

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After many years of teaching in secondary education, including six years in the Middle East, Elk Grove Adult and Community Education (EGACE) has been Geno’s professional home for the past five years. For the past three years, he has been teaching courses, using the Career Choices and Changes in EGACE’s bridge-to-post-secondary program, “Career and Academic Preparation” (CAP), Geno demonstrates exceptional skills and knowledge of college and career education through. He is a high-energy and innovative instructor whose passion for teaching and learning keeps his students engaged and moving toward the goal of successful transition into post-secondary education, training, and/or a career. He teaches his students how to explore their options to meet their education, career, and lifestyle goals; develop professional and computer skills; and how to use new financial tools to improve their everyday life. He has presented at various conferences and training and has consulted with several adult education agencies and community colleges around the state to provide resources and support for their college and career readiness programs.

The majority of Geno’s students successfully complete the program, and they have reported back to him that they have enrolled in community college or Sacramento State University and are working toward their goal of earning post-secondary degree; they have obtained jobs working for the state of California, as well as careers for which they trained and/or worked in their native country. They have formed cross-culture support groups while in class, and they continue to support one another even after they have completed the program. One of his students, who was living in a homeless shelter with her two teenaged children during the time she was attending the class, is now living on her own and has started a catering business. Both of her children are now enrolled in a community college in Sacramento. Another former student got a job working at the State Chancellor’s Office. After 18 months of employment, she was twice promoted and receives full health benefits, a full retirement package, and 401K/457 plans.

Geno also works at the Folsom-Cordova Adult School as a transition specialist. In this role he meets with students to assist them as they prepare to move from adult education into post-secondary education, career training, and/or a career.

Submitted by the CCAE Northern Section

In Memoriam

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Paul Shatswell, Principal of Pittsburg Adult School passed away Sunday, March 24th. He had been principal at Pittsburg Adult School since May 2018.

His family and his Pittsburg USD colleagues have arranged for an opportunity to gather with Paul's family, friends and colleagues to honor Paul's life.   

Here are the specifics: 

What: Celebration of Life
Date: Friday, April 5th, 2019
Time: 7:00 p.m.
Location:  Pittsburg USD Creative Arts Center
Pittsburg High School
250 School Street
Pittsburg, CA 94565

In addition, the Pittsburg Adult Education Center (PAEC) is collecting cash contributions or grocery gift cards to help offset the costs for the care of Paul's youngest three boys (6, 12 & 13 years old). If you are interested in making contributions to this fund, please contact Lisa Williams (Accountant), Pittsburg Adult Education Center (PAEC), 1151 Stoneman Avenue, Pittsburg, CA 94565.  Lisa can also be reached at 925-473-2403 (direct line).  The main number at PAEC is 925-473-2400.

2019 CCAE State Conference Overflow Hotel

HILTON SAN DIEGO AIRPORT/HARBOR ISLAND-$219

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A dedicated website is now available to reserve rooms for 2019 CCAE State Conference on April 25-27, 2019 in San Diego, California at the Hilton San Diego Airport/Harbor Island. Please note that the Hilton San Diego Airport/Harbor Island hotel is located 0.8 miles (16 minute walk) from the conference hotel.

Book online or call 1.800.445.8667 and use Group Code: CCAE.

Student Success Story: Xiaoyi Yi Li

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Xiaoyi Yi Li was born in the province of Guangdong in China. Her father was a teacher and the inspiration for Xiaoyi Yi to become a teacher as well. Growing up, she always enjoyed school and started learning English in middle school. She was a top student and received numerous academic awards. Xiaoyi Yi became an elementary school teacher and taught in China for six years, then resigned to emigrate to the United States in 1999.

She had met her husband when they were in China, but he and his family had also emigrated to the United States and they were married in California. Xiaoyi Yi was anxious to continue her education in America.  She recalls arriving in California on a Friday, going to an amusement park that weekend, and registering for ESL classes at the Rosemead Adult School on Monday. She was put on wait list, so she decided to enroll in evening classes at Rosemead High School where she was placed in ESL Level 1 (Beginning Low). She was later called by the Rosemead Center where she was reevaluated and placed into Connie Villaruel’s Intermediate-Low class in the morning and Carmen Garcia’s ESL Level 3 class in the afternoon. Xiaoyi Yi finished all levels of ESL, completing the program in 2001.

Xiaoyi Yi’s next step was the High School Independent Studies Program which she completed in 2003. At the same time, she was working on her high school diploma, Xiaoyi Yi was taking classes at Pasadena City College where she obtained both an Associates of Arts and Associates of Science degrees with a major in Applied and Liberal Arts Studies.

In 2001 Xiaoyi Yi was hired as a part- time Adult Education Assistant. After learning additional skills in the workplace, she moved to the ESL Resource Office where she assisted in registering and giving placement tests to students, scanning CASAS tests and assisting the Resource teacher with a variety of projects. During this time, Xiaoyi Yi had two children and like so many adult students, balanced family, home and work. In 2006 she became an election volunteer inspector for Los Angeles County.  In 2015, she was hired as a Para Educator for the ESL Department where she helps students in the Beginning Literacy class. She gives educational support to students and prepares teaching materials for teachers.

Xiaoyi Yi is a lifelong learner who continues taking classes at El Monte- Rosemead Adult School and is certified in several CTE pathways, including Accounting Fundamentals, computer certifications at the expert level, and is currently in the Administrative Assistant pathway.

What impresses Xiaoyi Yi most about adult education is the dedication of the students, especially the effort the older adults make to come to school every day, and how happy students are to be there. Xiaoyi Yi is very happy to help students with all of their needs and truly enjoys giving them the same kind of encouragement her teachers had always given her.

As part of her commitment to adult education, Xiaoyi Yi became of member of CCAE. Whenever there is an event or fundraiser, she is there to help translate for the ESL Beginning Low students and helps them access resources to pay for books, public transportation or get medical help.

Student Success Story: Liliana Aparicio

Summer IET student successfully transitions into Pharmacy Technician program

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Liliana Aparicio enrolled in English as a Second Language (ESL) classes in the summer of 2017. She completed the ESL program and never imagined transitioning to Career & Technical Education (CTE). Ms. Vicky Broccolo visited her ESL class last May and presented students with an overview of the Integrated Education & Training (IET) Pharmacy Technician course that was to be offered in the summer. Ms. Aparicio was highly motivated and told herself, “Just give it a try.” 

Her background is in Business Administration and she holds a Bachelor’s Degree from her native country El Salvador. During the Summer IET class she was able to appreciate the opportunity to become exposed to this fascinating career. She had held jobs in warehouses and hospital kitchens, which she disliked due to the lack of interaction with customers. She will be able to interact directly with people on a daily basis when she completes her training and become a certified pharmacy technician.

It has been a challenge for Liliana, since she is raising two young children, ages 6 and 4, while pursuing her goal of completing the Pharmacy Technician program. Her mother has been very supportive by being involved in her grandchildren’s education and upbringing. She also finds the language barrier a bit daunting, but so far she has persevered and overcome many challenges. After class, she goes home and relaxes for an hour, then goes to the library, where she catches up on the day’s lesson for three hours.

“I see the importance of the support that East LA Occupational Center offers all students, not only to help us learn English, but to encourage us to pursue a career through the Career Technical Education programs,” she added.

Her advice to her former ESL classmates, “Give it a try; you have to find something better for yourself and family.”

She would like to thank her current teacher, Ms. Broccolo, for her patience and leadership, Mr. Bill Hrycyna, Ms. Veronica Aguirre, and her husband for the motivation in pursuing this new challenge.

When on Twitter, Use #AdultEdu

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The adult education community has a strong positive presence on social media. Even if you don't have a Twitter account you can go to  https://twitter.com/search and type #AdultEdu so that you can keep up-to-date. If tweeting, make sure you include that hashtag in your post so that other members of the community can find you and follow you. And if you are wondering if it does work, check out a series of more recent posts by the Honorable Assembly Member Kevin McCarty related to our work and his experience as an adult learner.

  • About earning his high school diploma at San Juan USD's Winterstein Adult Ed - CLICK HERE.

  • About the value of adult education - CLICK HERE

  • After speaking to a group of adult education administrators  - CLICK HERE

And of course, you will always get useful information and professional development if you follow your professional associations at @CCAEstate and @COABEHQ.

IMPORTANT: CAEP Directory (Data Needed)

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Dear Colleague,

As you know, CCAE has been compiling a directory of Adult Ed providers which includes primary contacts, program areas they deliver instruction in, and total number of students served. The goal is to strengthen local sharing of best practices by creating a directory of programs that is easy to use.

You may remember that we had this before flexibility, and it was quite popular and useful. If you have not done so yet, please take a few minutes to click HERE to complete the short form for your Adult Ed school to ensure it is included in the directory.

If you need assistance, please contact administrator@ccaestate.org to schedule an appointment with our dedicated staff who can help you or one of your lead staff complete the form in under 5 minutes.

We appreciate your help with this important work!

Sincerely,

Steve Curiel
CCAE President

Adult Education Week: April 8-12, 2019

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Adult Education Week is a good time to build awareness of your programs within the community. Ask your mayor, city council or county board of supervisors to declare one day during the week as ”Adult and Continuing Education Day.” Plan events for the week and let your local media know about them. Schedule an open house, create in-school displays and bulletin boards that focus on your school’s programs and achievements, hang a banner, honor your students, recognize teachers. It’s a week to tell the community where you are and what you do. 

CCAE History–Celebrating 75 Years

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As we celebrate the 75th Anniversary of the California Council for Adult Education (CCAE), I think it's appropriate to take a look back at a bit of our history.

The early growth and development of adult education support groups, such as CCAE, has not been well documented. We do know however, that a support group called the California Association for Adult Education (CAAE) was formed in 1926 to promote the goals of adult education and it continued to function until 1937. Because of the seven year time lapse, it has never been fully determined whether or not there was a connection between CAAE and CCAE. We do know however, that in 1944, George C. Mann was the Chief of the Bureau of Adult Education (now the Adult Education Office, California Department of Education) and that he is credited as the driving force behind the founding of the California Council for Adult Education during the 1943-1944 school year. In addition, he served as the first Executive Director of CCAE.

The main purpose for forming CCAE was the need to have some grassroots support for Dr. Mann and the Adult Education Division in working with the legislature when they were pushing for positive legislation for adult education. If local adult education administrators could work with legislators in the local areas and personalize the needs of adult education, then we could have greater success gaining their support in Sacramento. Professional development was also an issue that needed addressing.

Several other educators have been recognized as contributing to the early organization of CCAE. Leo James, assistant to Dr. Mann, worked on the goals and purposes of the organization. E. Manfred Evans, from Los Angeles, continued the work for Mann when the Chief of the Bureau was called into service for the Navy during World War II, and Guy Garrard and Louise Heyl, who were both leaders in adult education in the 1940's and later became CCAE presidents, were instrumental in organizing and promoting CCAE around the state.

As mentioned above, Dr. Mann was the first Executive Director of CCAE, and he continued for about a dozen years in the duel role of CCAE Executive Director and Chief of the Bureau of Adult Education. His role in founding CCAE and guiding it through the early years cannot be minimized. Without his efforts there would be no CCAE, and adult education would most certainly not have been as successful as it has been over the years. In 1956, Dr. Mann retired from the Bureau and as Executive Director. It is interesting to note that his successor, Stanley Sworder, continued the tradition of serving in both capacities. So, there has always been a strong link between CCAE and the Department.

Next month: The Structure of CCAE

This information was condensed from the CCAE State Leadership Handbook, 2018-2019. Most of the information was researched by Steve Prantalos (Executive Director, 1999-2013) and Virginia Donnellan, (President, 1995-1996).

2019 CCAE State Conference Accepted Presentations

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Accepted Presentations

Collaborate with your colleagues from around the state on April 25-27, 2019 in San Diego, California at the Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina.

The conference team has selected more than 97 innovative sessions that will enhance and enrich instruction and student support services in the field. 

Click the button below to view a list of all accepted sessions organized by title.

 

Next Steps for Presenters

  1. Make your hotel reservations at the San Diego Hotel & Marina. Rooms will go quickly, so don't delay!

  2. Register for the 2019 CCAE State Conference. (All presenters must register for the conference by February 15, 2019)

  3. Ensure your membership is up to date. If unsure, please contact membership@ccaestate.org to check. (All presenters must have current membership)

  4. Download the CCAE app.

Teacher Spotlight

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Southern Section wishes to spotlight two of our own powerhouse teachers, Francisco Lopez (Chaffey Adult School) and Roland Espinosa (Inland Career Education Center).

Francisco, a 21-year veteran teacher, and 2016 CCAE State Excellence in Teaching awardee and Teacher of the Year for Moreno Valley Unified School District in 2018, with 12 years at Chaffey Adult School, is currently teaching Online-HS diploma and ABE math, began his Adult Education (AE) career in ESL, and is also a full-time 2nd grade teacher. Roland, also a two-time award winning teacher, as District Teacher of the Year in 2000 for Santa Ana Unified, and as a 2016 CCAE State Excellence in Teaching awardee, started his career in elementary and middle school 27 years ago, then entered AE in 2011 at the Inland Career and Education Center where he has taught in the ABE, ASE and ESL program areas. Currently, Roland teaches five GED courses that prepare students for their Reasoning Through Language Arts and Social Studies exams.

Both Francisco and Roland note that teaching in AE is incredibly rewarding and provides adults with opportunities for career pathways. Francisco enjoys teaching fractions to his students, and he utilizes technology in the classroom to assist in their learning. Francisco says, "Teaching adults is like a walk in the park for me. I love the fact that students want to be here." Roland points out that it is amazing that students who may not have been in an academic setting for many years can apply themselves and thrive academically. Roland says, "I enjoy witnessing the transformation of how students feel empowered to transition on to college and career opportunities after passing their GED exams."

Francisco and Roland have been members of CCAE for 8 and 5 years respectively. Both, jumped into CCAE leadership positions right away. Starting at the chapter level, both have been Chapter Presidents; Roland with the San Bernardino Chapter and Francisco with the Chaffey Chapter for which he was a founding member. Presently, Francisco is serving a second term as Southern Section President and Roland is serving as President-Elect. It is also important to note that Francisco and Roland are the 2019 CCAE State Conference Co-Chairs. They have brought together a large team of fellow teachers, clerical support staff and administrators to put adult education in the spotlight and to celebrate the 75th Anniversary of CCAE.

Francisco Lopez and Roland Espinosa are extraordinary adult education teachers who go above and beyond for their students, their districts and the adult education field. Their CCAE Southern Section Board Members are honored to spotlight Francisco's and Roland's contribution to adult education.

First Financial Credit Union: CD Has An Impressive Rate of 4.50% APY

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Founded 85 years ago by educators for educators, First Financial Credit Union takes tremendous pride in serving the financial needs of the educational community and has proudly done so since 1933. Unlike other credit unions, we have a closed field of membership—not open to the general public—which further strengthens our commitment to the educational community.

If you work in the educational community, ask about our convenience-based products and services that you won’t find elsewhere, including our School Employee Flex Share Certificate (CD), which has an impressive rate of 4.50% APY.*

For more information, please contact Community Relations Director, Therese El Khouryat (800) 537-8491 extension 3123, (626) 315-7716, or telkhoury@ffcu.org.

Must meet First Financial Credit Union (FFCU) eligibility requirements and establish membership in order to take advantage of these offers. *APY=Annual Percentage Yield. Restrictions apply, including only one School Employee Flex Share Certificate (CD) per member and/or per household. Fixed-term of 12 months from date of opening. A minimum opening deposit is required. Dividends are paid only at maturity and will automatically transfer to member’s FFCU savings or checking account. Federally insured by NCUA. Information accurate as of November 2018. Call for complete details.  

In a California elementary school, parents have a classroom of their own

Yordanos Habte hands out practice absence slips to her classmates at Fruitvale Elementary School in Oakland, California on Oct. 1, 2018. She is a student in a family literacy class at her child's school. The class help parents learn skills, such as writing notes to their childrens' teachers.

Yordanos Habte hands out practice absence slips to her classmates at Fruitvale Elementary School in Oakland, California on Oct. 1, 2018. She is a student in a family literacy class at her child's school. The class help parents learn skills, such as writing notes to their childrens' teachers.

Inside a classroom at Fruitvale Elementary School in Oakland, California, about 20 women are practicing spelling out loud in English.

They’re the mothers, aunts and grandmothers of children at the school. Four mornings each week, the women — immigrants from Central America, Mexico, the Middle East, Asia and the Caribbean — drop off their children and then head into a classroom of their own to learn English.

Wahbiai Alqaifi, a mother from Yemen, has been in the US for 15 years. She has six children, one of them a fourth grader at Fruitvale. She used to struggle to understand English in her daily life, she says, but the class helped her expand her vocabulary.

“When I go the store, when I go the hospital, I understand a lot,” Alqaifi says.

Oakland Unified School District is one of more than 100 school districts nationwide working on family literacy, teaching parents English and helping them engage in their students’ education, which in turn helps the children do better in school. Adult education programs struggle for funding, so these programs are not widespread across the country. But in the Oakland schools that offer the program, principals and teachers say the benefits are real: Parents get more involved in their children’s classrooms and are able to help more with homework. And the fact that Oakland’s program is held inside elementary, middle and high schools is part of what makes it work.

2018 Legislative Session Officially Comes to a Close, Governor Signs Sponsored Bill

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As of September 30th, the 2017-18 legislative session officially came to an end with the Governor taking final action on the bills sent to him by the Legislature before they adjourned on August 31st.  The issues debated this year were diverse and, at times, controversial ranging from wildfire liability to privacy to sexual harassment and more.  Impacting much of the debate and shaping policy proposals were actions taken at the federal level by the Trump Administration and also by the #MeToo movement.  In the final weeks of the legislative session, hundreds of bills were heard and ultimately, many received enough support to pass.  Further, this session was Governor Brown's final round as he moves towards the end of his fourth and final term as governor. 

In terms of a historical perspective, since 2011 Governor Brown vetoed 10.7% to 15% of the bills he was presented.  This year's totals were at 1,016 bills signed and 201 vetoed, with his highest veto rate ever at 16.5%.

Among the many bills signed this session was CCAE and CAEAA's sponsored bill, AB 2098 (McCarty), related to immigrant integration.  You will recall that the proposal was originally part of our FY 18-19 Budget framework along with increased funding, instituting a COLA, changing the term "grant" in AEBG and addressing the inequities in the indirect rates. As shared with the field in our July update, the Department of Finance, Administration and budget committees ultimately decided the issue needed to go through a policy process rather than a budget process.  Hence, we moved quickly to identify authors in Assemblyman Kevin McCarty (D-Sacramento)(Chair, Senate Budget Subcommittee on Education) and Assemblyman Tony Thurmond (D-Richmond)(Candidate for Superintendent of Public Instruction).  Both members were a pleasure to work for and wholeheartedly supported moving the bill forward. 

Fortunately, there was widespread, bipartisan agreement that instituting immigrant integration metrics into the Adult Education Program, as applicable, made sense to ensure the needs and outcomes of our immigrant and refugee students who may not yet measure up against the Program's current academic literacy and career progress metrics were explicitly accounted for going forward.  As you all know better than anyone, serving immigrant and refugee adults in need of English language skills has been at the core of adult education since its inception.  Immigrant and refugee students come to adult schools to develop literacy, and in doing so, gain cultural competency and literacy more broadly defined as health, financial, digital literacy, parenting and family literacy, and civic engagement, all also critical to successful transition to college and careers.

To be clear, AB 2098 is permissive and applies as applicable for adult schools and community colleges.  It seeks to address the lack of metrics for these students in the Program by incorporating immigrant integration metrics consistent with English Language Civics ("EL Civics") and associated Civic Objectives and Additional Assessment Plans (COAAPs) that are already in use for federal WIOA reporting purposes into the Adult Education Program.  Doing so will help preserve and ensure access and support for these students who are most in need of the programs and services offered in adult education by providing the tools for the students and adult education providers to demonstrate outcomes and progress for these students.  Also of note, while permissive as applicable, the language also provides flexibility for those adult schools, community colleges and partners who are collaborating and pushing the boundaries of the EL Civics to be able to do so for the benefit of their students.

At the end of the day, the Legislature wholeheartedly passed AB 2098 with unanimous, bipartisan support and no "NO" votes.  The bill was subsequently sent to the Governor who signed the bill on September 26th. 

Kudos to you all for your support, letters and overall assistance in pushing the bill to the finish line - this is a significant victory for you and for the students we serve. And thank you to San Jose City Mayor Sam Liccardo, San Jose - Evergreen Community College District, ACCE, ALLIES, ACSA, CATESOL, CFT Local 4681, the California Immigrant Policy Center, Chinese for Affirmative Action and many other organizations across the state who provided support and grassroots engagement. Congratulations!

For more information on AB 2098, please see http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201720180AB2098.


Looking Ahead to 2019, Moving Adult Education Forward

It is that time of the year when CAEAA and CCAE begin formulating priorities for the next budget cycle and legislative session.  As you know, it is an election year with not only a host of changes in legislative offices possible but also changes in important statewide offices such as for Governor and Superintendent of Public Instruction.  While it will be some time yet before we are able to fully understand the priorities of the newly elected, we must get started on determining our own priorities for adult education to continue to move us forward.  In this regard, we would welcome feedback from the field on policy and budget proposals you would like to see considered for action in 2019.  Some of the issues we are already considering include additional funding in the budget, legislation to address the challenges and reciprocity for credentialing of teachers, Education Code changes, career technical education investments and fees, and more.  If you have ideas about these issues or others you'd like to have considered by both boards, please share with us no later than October 15th.  While we have some time, we must begin evaluating the proposed priorities, determining which to move forward in 2019, prepare language and materials, and begin reaching out to the Department of Finance, Legislature and stakeholders to ensure the smoothest path to success we can hope to achieve. 

We thank you for your engagement and look forward to another productive legislative and budget year ahead in support of adult education!